An Approach to Improvement in Heat Flow Analysis of Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT)

Authors

  • Vishnu P A Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, SIES Graduate School of Technology, University of Mumbai, India. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3763-7350
  • Samarth Patil Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, SIES Graduate School of Technology, University of Mumbai, India
  • Rishab R. Kannamvar Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, SIES Graduate School of Technology, University of Mumbai, India.
  • Pradip Patil SIES Graduate School of Technology https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5190-1154

Keywords:

CFD, CVT, Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, automatic transmission, Flow Analysis

Abstract

Article history: Continuous Variable Transmissions (CVTs) are one of the most widely used automatic transmissions in light vehicles, and yet CVT cooling remains a major issue in high load and high torque conditions. CVTs operate at very high rpm which poses a threat under the OSHA criteria for 'Hazardous Energy Control' which necceciates shielding of rotating components. Guards shall be protected against the hazardous release of energy. The purpose of this research is to find an efficient way to cool a CVT, implementing various aspects of fluid Mechanics, heat Transfer, and CAE. This study includes a improvement in standard CVT with its casing and various modification, like fins, ducts, and fans. The tests and analyses show the effectiveness of up to three different combinations and result in about 7 °C reductions in the CVT temperature using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The results would help understand and overcome the current limitations of a CVT and implement the improvements efficiently in light to medium weight vehicles.

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References

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Published

2021-09-25

How to Cite

[1]
V. . P A, S. Patil, R. . R. Kannamvar, and P. Patil, “An Approach to Improvement in Heat Flow Analysis of Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT)”, Int J Eng and Appl Phys, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 216–225, Sep. 2021.

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